DRY GIN

Production
process

Opyos is created via traditional copper still distillation. We found that this method allows us to achieve complete expression of our locally based botanicals during our distilling processes.
To distil our gin, we firstly need a base alcohol. For this purpose, we are using a 96% vol neutral alcohol. It is completely free of odour and flavour, exactly what we need to produce our individual notes during distillation. We fill this alcohol into tanks, and overnight, a part of our meticulously balanced botanicals mixture macerate inside. That way, the distinct oils, essences, and flavours have enough time to evolve. The profound taste and vibrant body of the final product are also due to the outstanding quantity of botanicals that we are processing in our mash.

Distilling is the heart of the process. The mash slowly heats up to boiling temperature and the first alcohol vapour is ascends the firing column and reacts with the copper. At this point we put emphasis on a slow distilling pace. This takes more time and it is a small but fine detail of our production process that you will later not only experience in the flavour but also in the mouthfeel of our gin. After distilling, the gin is stressed and will need some rest. It now has 86% vol on average and we are giving the gin with all its different aromas eight weeks in order to unite and become a whole. The last piece of the story we perform before bottling, is adding demineralised water. We add little by little in order to reduce the gin to our drinking strength of 44% vol.

Distilling is the heart of the process. The mash slowly heats up to boiling temperature and the first alcohol vapour is ascends the firing column and reacts with the copper. At this point we put emphasis on a slow distilling pace. This takes more time and it is a small but fine detail of our production process that you will later not only experience in the flavour but also in the mouthfeel of our gin. After distilling, the gin is stressed and will need some rest. It now has 82% vol on average and we are giving the gin with all its different aromas 8 weeks in order to unite and become a whole. The last piece of the story we perform before bottling, is adding demineralised water. We add little by little in order to reduce the gin to our drinking strength of 44% vol.

Local
Botanicals

SLOE (PRUNUS SPINOSA FRUCT.)

Sloes can be found all over Luxembourg. This thorny hedge is domiciled along many paths, forests and meadows. The fruits are dark blue and extremely bitter. After the first frost, they become ever so slightly edible, so this is the right moment for us to harvest them. It helps our gin to get a strongly aromatic, slight bitterness that plays an important role in its overall character.

SLOE (PRUNUS SPINOSA FRUCT.)

Sloes can be found all over Luxembourg. This thorny hedge is domiciled along many paths, forests and meadows. The fruits are dark blue and extremely bitter. After the first frost, they become ever so slightly edible, so this is the right moment for us to harvest them. It helps our gin to get a strongly aromatic, slight bitterness that plays an important role in its overall character.

ROSEHIP (CYNOSBATI FRUCT.)

Rosehips are the fruit of the dog rose (Rosa canina or Rosa rubiginosa), a variable, climbing rose species that sprouts throughout the country. At full maturity, the fruit has a vibrant red colour, is bitterly sweet and is used, if at all, to make tea, liquor or jam. Also in popular medicine it is a highly valued plant. In our gin it harmonises with the sweetness of the honey, and yet still contributes a bitter spiciness.

BLACKBERRY (RUBUS SECTIO RUBUS, VAR. FRUTICOSUS)

Blackberries are found primarily alongside forests, but they can also be seen next to meadows, paths, creeks and rivers. The small, mostly blue-blackish fruits ripen between August and September and develop a very pleasant sweetness. From this, the gin is developing a fruity, a wider and more dense taste.

BLACKBERRY (RUBUS SECTIO RUBUS, VAR. FRUTICOSUS)

Blackberries are found primarily alongside forests, but they can also be seen next to meadows, paths, creeks and rivers. The small, mostly blue-blackish fruits ripen between August and September and develop a very pleasant sweetness. From this the gin is develops a fruity, a wider and more dense taste.

ELDERBERRY (SAMBUCUCI EBULI FRUCT.)

Elderberries are present in hedgerows, forests and in villages. They can grow into a 8 m tall tree, with a well-shaped, round crown. The elderberries are imbuing the ensemble with chocolate and roast aromas, which develop during the drying process.

ELDERFLOWER (SAMBUCI FLOR.)

The flowers are small, yellowish-white, and appear in June. The arising odour from these flowers is distinctively fresh and fruity, and adds to the invigorating note of our gin.

ELDERFLOWER (SAMBUCI FLOR.)

The flowers are small, yellowish-white, and appear in June. The arising odour from these flowers is distinctively fresh and fruity, and adds to the invigorating note of our gin.

ROSE PETAL (ROSAE RUBRAE FLOR.)

From the rose hedge, we are only pick the very best leaves during full bloom, in pursuance of getting the optimal scent we are looking for. These emphasise the perfumed aspect even more.

PINE SEEDLING (PINUS SILVESTRIS TURIONES)

There are many different pine varieties spread across Europe and Luxembourg. The Scots pine can be identified by its red bark and long spiky needles. The seedlings are packed with essential oils and resin, which are inducing a ‘woody’, and together with the citrus notes, a ‘Mediterranean’ character.

PINE SEEDLING (PINUS SILVESTRIS TURIONES)

There are many different pine varieties spread across Europe and Luxembourg. It can be identified by its red bark and long spiky needles. The seedlings are packed with essential oils and resin, which are inducing a ‘woody’, and together with the citrus notes, a ‘Mediterranean’ character.

HONEY (MEL)

Just like in the cycle of nature, the honeybee also plays a very important role in our circular company philosophy. The honey, which is being produced by our own beehives, is contributing to a round, smooth mouthfeel and rounds off the gin’s taste.

Tasting
Notes

Nose

Dominating juniper in the beginning, together with notes of different berries and blossoms. Followed by a freshness tracing back to citrus fruits. In the end, bitter and spicy aromas are adding to the complexity.

Palate

Complex, reflecting the aromas from the nose. The juniper that is dominating at the beginning, is sliding to the background and is leaving a wide, fruity, crisp taste with nuances of spiciness and a certain sweetness.

Finish

Rounded off and harmonious. The honey, the bold spiciness from the juniper and coriander and the citrus notes ensure a rather intense but pleasant sensation that remains for a while.

Serving
Suggestions

Thanks to its balanced flavour and lovely mouthfeel, Opyos Luxembourg Dry Gin is meant to be sipped neat or over ice. If you decide to go for a classic G&T, we recommend using a botanical/mediterranean tonic in order to round off the complex aroma profile.

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